Baern

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Baern last won the day on May 16 2017

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About Baern

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  • Birthday 11/25/1989

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  1. The last time Baern strode through Thunder Bluff, there had been blood. The Bloodhoof braves he walked past? They would have been his targets. The bustling tipis and longhouses nearby burned or looted. Instead, here he was, flanked by a pair of Ashtotem braves, just another tauren visitor to this tauren city. They stuck out, but less than he'd expected. Few regarded him with more than a passing glance and those that did linger only offered a few seconds of cold glaring before moving on with their day. The most garish thing about them was the warpaint they wore, but even that wasn't exactly
  2. Full Name: Maznar Cliffgrove Date of Birth: Sixty years before the Dark Portal Age: 94 Race: Bronzebeard Dwarf Gender: Male Hair: Black Skin: Tan Eyes: Green Height: 4' 5" Weight: 195lbs Place of residence: Greenwarden's Grove Place of Birth: Dun Modr Occupation: Mountaineer Group/Guild affiliation: Night Vanguard Enemies: Dragonmaw Orcs, Dark Iron Dwarves Favorite Foods: Bloomin' Onions, Beer Basted Boar Ribs, Ram Flank Stew Favorite Drinks: Beer, Ale, Lager Favorite Colors: Green, Blue Weapons of Choice: Though not sentimental enough to name it, Maznar has been working on a customized rifle
  3. Full Name: Gahnder Rendler Nicknames: None Date of Birth: 43 Years Before the Dark Portal Age: 72 at time of death Race: Human, then forsaken Gender: Male Hair: Grey Skin: Grey Eyes: Yellow Height: 5' 6" Weight: 125lbs Place of residence: Dalaran Place of Birth: Gilneas City Known Relatives: None Languages: Common, Dwarvish, Gnomish, Darnassian, Thalassian, Orcish, Gutterspeak, Goblin, Pandaren, Eredun Occupation: Retired Group/Guild affiliation: Sanctuary Guild Rank: Member Likes: Smoking, Reading, Writing, Criminals, Commonfolk, Performing Dislikes: Mages, Nobles, Religion Favorite Foods: No
  4. Full Name: Tonric Anthony Baur Nicknames: 'Ric Date of Birth: Spring, Ten years before the Dark Portal Age: 43 Race: Stormwind Human Gender: Male Hair: Black Eyes: Green Height: 6' 2" Weight: 195lbs Place of residence: Ratchet Place of Birth: Goldshire Known Relatives: Johann Baur (Son), Geren Baur (Father), Arlebrand Baur (Brother), Catherine Baur (Sister), Marta Baur (Mother) Languages: Common, Dwarvish, Darnassian, Orcish, Thalassian Occupation: Vigilante. Formerly Blacksmith, Military Officer, Knight Group/Guild affiliation: None. Formerly the Honorborn, Night Vanguard, Brotherhood of th
  5. Ok, so, last time I said I was going to handle another kind of story structure. But I first want to go into why I wanted to do that and engage a bit with the way that I talk about the Three Act Structure in the very first post of this series. Because it's so fundamentally popular for writers in arguably our strongest media output in feature film, Three Act Structure has attracted its fair share of haters. Mostly, this is a backlash to people doing exactly what I recommended you don't do, which is plug and play certain aspects in order to arbitrarily fit the Three Act Stucture. When you u
  6. Today, we're going to back into story structure but this time we're going to dive deep. A lot of the stuff I've covered so far has been deep dives into certain concepts, but I want to be comprehensive here. Today, we're going to talk about: Beats. And then also scenes and sequences and acts and the story itself. But all that stuff starts with the beat. So, even though I'm going to go and define all of these things after the fact, I'm going to head this one up with my definition of what a "beat" is. The beat is the smallest, distinct moment in a story. Now, today we're going to focus o
  7. Antagonist Types ===================================================== This one is kind of going to be a listicle and I kind of apologize for that. But I do want to stick up for the format a bit just from the perspective of the helpfulness of categorization. In fact, from my perspective, this whole exercise is one massive effort to help me compartmentalize my own thoughts and understanding when it comes to storytelling. Without it, a lot of these principles are kind of lost to the Aether and don't get condensed into any kind of tangible thought or meaning. My other disclaimer about t
  8. McGuffins Alright, folks, I've decided to do McGuffins mostly because things are busy and I don't have a ton of time on my hands. Let's begin at the beginning: Alfred Hitchcock coined the term "McGuffin" to mean: The object of the characters' desire in any given story. The explicit thing that motivates the plot and characters of the story, that drives everything forward. The Ark, in Raiders of the Lost Ark , The Ring, in Lord of the Rings, any one of the assorted infinity stones in any of the Marvel movies. These would all be McGuffins. Pretty simple, right? Well, just like ev
  9. Pathos/Ethos/Logos are three greek words that I learned in college and have fallen in love with since. They're, of course, created by Aristotle, but he envisioned them by way of debate or persuasion. These were three terms that you used to convince somebody of something. From his perspective, you had: 1) Ethos: An appeal to someone's morality or ethics. You used this to establish your credibility or moral character. 2) Pathos: An appeal to someone's emotions. You used this to create an emotional response. 3) Logos: An appeal to logic. You used this to appeal to somebody's sense of reaso
  10. Alright! So, I was going to start with pathos/ethos/logos, but as soon as I got into a mindset where I was thinking about these things and what they meant, I realized that I needed to do some more groundwork first. After all, these are greek terms, so we need to go back to the greek that forms some of the bedrock of our understanding of storytelling: Aristotle. Aristotle wrote a book called the "Poetics" and in it he basically tries to define storytelling, though through the lens of storytelling of his day: Epic Poetry, Tragedy, and Comedy. Unfortunately, the one he wrote on comedy is lo
  11. Now, I've talked a lot about the larger than life stakes that I go nuts for, but I want to dwell on the opposite for a moment and really illustrate why focusing on small stakes can be of great benefit to your story. There are folks that are unlike me that have a very tough time with epic stakes. Why? Because RP is small. And what I mean by that is, outside of locations and events that we control the entire context of, RP cannot as a rule affect the greater context of the game world. None of our RP will ever have the ability to redefine the world, and even if Lohd writes that we fai
  12. I'm going to start with stakes because it's on my mind with a recent RP. So, without further ado... STAKES Stakes are, simply put, my favorite fucking thing. I love stakes. I love high stakes. I love operatic, epic, end of the world if we don't beat him here stakes. And I think stakes are crucial to good RP and good storytelling. But I'm getting a bit ahead of myself. Let's just start with a definition. Stakes are the collateral that the protagonists put up when they bet on themselves to achieve their goal. If they fail, whatever's at stake is lost. I mention "bet o
  13. ALRIGHT I'M BACK AND BETTER THAN EVER FOR CHRISTMAS THIS YEAR. Act 3 is here. Act 3 is where you finish up the story. You want to resolve all the plot threads that you've given out so far (unless you're leaving some kind of hook for a new, future story) and close off the story so that your players can reach a satisfying conclusion. Act 2 is full of vectors, bouncing off and around on different issues, many of them incremental to whatever the big, fat main tension of your story is. Act 3 will typically have one vector and it will be compressed in time. If you're going to run only on
  14. Not just because I live there, I'd like to pitch a bit about Los Angeles. Pros: -Having locals means cars, parking, pickups from LAX are super easy -LAX is one of the most important airports in the country, flights are easy, cheap and direct -The weather will be nice even during the off-season so winter trips can still be sunny and warm -Disneyland, Universal Studios and Six Flag are all awesome destinations for day trips -Transportation is easy (Arahe, myself and Seguul are all locals with cars seating 15 people just between the three of us.) -Renting beach houses/hollywood
  15. I've been thinking a lot about storylines and storytelling recently, and so I wanted to take a moment to post. I think there's another version of this where I write it as a recommendation for people, especially people that have never run a plotline before, but at the end of the day, I really don't feel like I'm enough of an authority on anything in order to be doling out that advice. In fact, the only reason I'm really writing this is because it's 2AM and I'm working the graveyard shift and there's no one to talk to and, oh, yeah, because I kind of don't feel like I've set aside a time or spac